PhotoPills Mammoth Lakes 1-Day Bootcamp!

PhotoPills Mammoth Lakes 1-Day Bootcamp!

DESCRIPTION:

Get ready to learn how to plan, shoot, and edit any photo you imagine with the Sun, the Moon, and the Milky Way.

Joshua Cripps from Pro Photo Tips will give you all you need to nail your shots, from equipment to camera settings and editing. And Rafael (the bard) from the PhotoPills team will teach you how to use the PhotoPills app to plan your photo ideas. So you’re always at the right place at the right time, to capture the scene you want, to tell the story you want.

After the theory class, we’ll get to practice in the field till dawn.

PROGRAM:

10 – 11am: Milky Way and Star Trails Planning with PhotoPills

11 – 12:30am: Milky Way Photography and Post Processing

Break for Lunch

2 – 3:30pm: Sun and Moon Planning with PhotoPills

3:30 – 5pm: Long Exposure with Filters

5 – 6pm: Examples and Q&A

Break for Dinner

7:30 pm Photo escape near Mammoth lakes (Sunset and Milky Way)

Lightroom: How to Really Really Really Use the Gradient Filter, Part 2


How to use the gradient filter in Lightroom. This tool is part of LR’s suite of powerful local editing tools. In this 2-part video learn when to use the grad filter, how to create, edit, and layer gradient filters, keyboard shortcuts, presets, real-world examples, best practices and more.

Until next time have fun and happy shooting!

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

Lightroom: How to Really Really Really Use the Gradient Filter, Part 1

How to use the gradient filter in Lightroom. This tool is part of LR’s suite of powerful local editing tools. In this 2-part video learn when to use the grad filter, how to create, edit, and layer gradient filters, keyboard shortcuts, presets, real-world examples, best practices and more.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

How to Create an Amazing Landscape Photo: Part 3 – Post Processing


Create amazing landscape photos by keeping things simple. In this video learn how to use post processing to bring out the best of the raw file you captured in the field.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

Photoshop Maximum File Size 2 GB?!?! How To Fix This

Annoyed by the maximum 2 GB limit for .PSD files? Here’s the super simple solution to get around this problem.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

Purakaunui Falls, A Brand New Behind the Lens Video Course

Have you ever wanted to crack open a working photographer’s head to understand what thoughts are running around inside during a shoot? Well this tutorial does exactly that. Filmed on location in New Zealand, this tutorial will walk you through an entire waterfall shoot I did and narrate my exact decision-making process, from why I chose the settings I did to how I narrowed down my composition. I’ll show you all the shots that didn’t make the cut and explain why not. And then I wrap it up with my complete post-processing workflow. This is truly a one-of-a-kind, start-to-finish look inside the creation of a landscape photo.

This is my first live action tutorial, as well as my first with a dedicated emphasis on in-field photography, composition, technique, and approach. It’s a totally unique style of video course, and I haven’t seen anything else like it out there. There’s an analysis of 42 landscape photos, of what works and what doesn’t for each, and how every step in the process leads to the end result. It’s an insanely jam-packed tutorial, worth a rewatch or 10 just to absorb everything I go over. Even if you don’t shoot waterfalls you’ll learn lots of great lessons on composition, technique, and approach.

You can check out the full course here, or as part of your subscription at the Nature Photography Academy.

purakaunui

What You’ll Learn

  • How I approach a scene, explore the options, and analyze compositions on the fly.
  • Which settings I use and why, the reasons behind when I change settings, and the rationale for my technique.
  • What mistakes I made in the field and how to correct them.
  • How to take a good composition and refine it to make it great.
  • Why I shoot “variations on a theme” to make sure I’ve captured the best possible image.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

Lightroom Adjustment Presets

Today I am going to show you a technique so that you can make a local adjustment preset in Lightroom! Which will help you to save time while making the same local adjustments over and over again.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

Using Vision to Process Your Raw Files into Spectacular Photos

“I never try to create the prettiest picture while I’m out in the field. Rather, I try to capture the best possible data.”

Stirling Falls, Milford Sound, New Zealand

Stirling Falls, Milford Sound, New Zealand

In this age of ubiquitous cameras and instant gratification whenever we snap a pic of something beautiful we want to see a gorgeous, punchy, saturated picture instantly appear on the back of our camera. In fact, I’ve heard more than one landscape photographer lament that their iPhone takes better pictures than their expensive DSLR. And while the iPhone photos may indeed look better right off the bat, it’s only because the phone is applying some automatic post-processing to increase saturation, contrast, and detail. And while all DSLRs should have the same kind of insta-processing built into them in the form of Picture Styles/Controls, using those punchy Vivid or Landscape styles in the field can be a mistake, for two reasons.

First, those picture styles effect the histogram you see when reviewing a photo on your camera, and the more punchy your picture style is the less accurately your histogram will reflect the actual raw data of your photo (assuming you’re shooting raw. You’re shooting raw, right??). Meaning the camera settings you’ve chosen might not actually be best for that scene. The second reason is that no matter how good those picture styles can make your photo look in the field, you can tune your processing with much more fidelity, accuracy, and subtlety by using a post-processing program like Lightroom or Photoshop. And so because of that, I never try to create the prettiest picture while I’m out in the field. Rather, I try to capture the best possible data. Because I know I can sculpt that data into a beautiful photo later in post. Let’s take a look at an example from Stirling Falls in New Zealand.

Stirling Falls, New Zealand. Straight Out Of Camera using Flat Picture Control, ISO 100, f/8, 1/15 sec, 78mm

Stirling Falls, New Zealand. Straight Out Of Camera using Flat Picture Control, ISO 100, f/8, 1/15 sec, 78mm

I’ll talk quickly about how I took the photo, then walk through the processing steps I took. For the capture itself I was standing on the deck of a moving boat, and because of that I knew I couldn’t pull off the typical long-shutter silkyness I often like in waterfall shots. But I still wanted a little motion, so I figured targeting a shutter speed of around 1/15 sec would get me some movement, while crossing my fingers that using Vibration Reduction -as well as having my camera mounted on a monopod- would let me hold sharp detail in the rocks. I had a polarizer on the lens, and with my ISO at 100 I found that an aperture of f/8 gave me a perfect exposure for my 1/15 sec shutter. I was using Nikon’s Flat picture control, and while you can see that the photo itself does indeed look very flat, the histogram is just about perfect, spanning a good dynamic range but without any clipped shadows or highlights.

Whereas had I used a different picture control to get a more punchy image in the field, I most likely would have looked at the histogram (shown here in Landscape Picture Control) and quickly underexposed the image a bit more to make sure I wasn’t blowing the highlights, thus either making my shutter speed faster and losing some motion of the water, or stopping down the aperture and losing some sharpness to diffraction. Neither of which are ideal choices. Which is again why I shoot for the best data in the field, not instant curb appeal.

Stirling Falls, New Zealand. Straight Out Of Camera using Landscape Picture Control. Note how histogram hints of blown highlights in the blue channel.

Stirling Falls, New Zealand. Straight Out Of Camera using Landscape Picture Control. Note how histogram hints of blown highlights in the blue channel.

For the processing of the image I started by asking myself the question: what is interesting to me about this image? I find the interplay of the rocks and water in the center of the image to be the most fascinating part of the photo, so in my processing I want to strongly enhance the texture, detail, and contrast there, and process the rest of the photo to draw the viewer’s eye to the middle by making it subtly darker and less contrasty. Here I used Adobe Camera Raw for all edits.

First off, I added a healthy dose of DeHazing to combat the filminess of the image, along with some Clarity for local contrast and Vibrance for color. I also increased the warmth of the image to remove some of the overall blueness. Then, to improve the dynamic range of the image I dragged the Whites up and the Blacks down. To decrease the brightness of the sheet of the water on the left I pulled down the highlights.

Already so much more interesting than the

Already so much more interesting than the “Landscape Style” shot, and we’re just getting started!

Then to really juice the contrast I made a strong s-curve tonal adjustment. This made the cool section in the middle really pop, but it also over-brightened the sheet of water on the left. So I brought in a graduated filter adjustment to darken that section. I added another grad filter on the right to brighten the top corner a bit for better tonal balance across the frame.

Strong tone curve for POP, and grad filters to achieve good tonal evenness across the frame.

Strong tone curve for POP, and grad filters to achieve good tonal evenness across the frame.

Finally, to help force the viewer’s eye to the interesting central part of the frame I added a small vignette to the edges. And voila, the processing was complete.

Vignette to draw attention away from the edges and to the center of the frame.

Vignette to draw attention away from the edges and to the center of the frame.

Here’s a before and after of the SOOC shot and the final image after post. You can see it’s an incredibly dramatic change, and it’s made possible entirely by not trying to create a pretty image in the field, but rather trying to capture pretty data.

Stirling Falls, Before and After

Stirling Falls, Before and After

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

To master these skills for yourself, to leave the guesswork out of choosing an exposure, and to learn to process your photos with vision, be sure to check out my Adobe Camera Raw video course. This course takes you through every tool and panel in Adobe Camera Raw and teaches you not just what they do, but how to use the program intelligently and effectively to bring your raw images to life. Also take a look at Histograms Exposed from Jay and Varina Patel, a course that walks you through the steps of getting a perfect exposure and capturing good data in the field every time.

Watermark Your Photos Effortlessly in Lightroom

If you are looking to defeat image pirates or see your name on your digital work, stick around and I’ll show you how you can add watermarks effortlessly in this Lightroom tutorial.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography

Lightroom Export Presets

This Lightroom tutorial shows you all about using presets in post processing so that you no longer have to export like a goober!

Now you don’t have to export your image separately for each social media platform, You’re Welcome!

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
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How Much Photoshop is Too Much?

Look at this new photo I have finished editing! – Yikes, why are your eyes bleeding??? Too much Photoshop? Ohhh…

Post-processing is an integral part of photography these days but it’s all too common in this digital era to see photos pushed past their breaking point.
Even great photos can be ruined when the Photoshopping gets out of hand.

The problem is when you’re in the thick of editing you often can’t see the forest for the trees and it’s tough to tell when you’ve gone overboard with your processing. So here are two simple techniques you can use to make sure no one ever describes your photo as over-processed puke.

Got another question? Check out our Landscape Photography FAQ here:
https://www.joshuacripps.com/landscape-photography-faq/

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel for even more landscape photography how-to.

Join Josh on Social!
http://instagram.com/joshuacrippsphotography
https://www.facebook.com/JoshuaCrippsPhotography